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Announcing the 1st Annual Book Architecture GIT-R-DONE Travel Grant

Last year, we traveled 19 states to tell the story of Doris Buffett’s unique philanthropy. Crafted with co-writer, Anita Mumm, and accompanied by Stephanie Craigs dynamic images, LETTERS TO DORIS: One Woman’s Quest to Help Those with Nowhere Else to Turn presents a slice of the heartwarming and selfless community that Doris created through her Letters Foundation. One thing that working with the Letters Foundation has taught us is that our charitable giving has been all…over..the…place. Executive Director, Amy Kingman, challenged us to really think about where we wanted to focus our efforts. What do we think is most helpful for the writers that we work with?

The answer was resoundingly clear: A travel stipend for the author of a work-in-progress to get away and finish the damn thing.

Book Architecture thrives as a finish line business.

Our proudest testimonials go something like: “We’ve been thinking as an organization of doing a book for ten years and with your help we were holding it in 9 months.”

 

Hence the BOOK ARCHITECTURE GIT-R-DONE GRANT was born.

Without further ado, then, the Particulars:

Grant Money Awarded: $2,500. Book Architecture will also provide 1 hr. of coaching prior to departure to help you get clear on your production goals and 1 hr. of coaching while you are away to help you stay on track.

Deadline: Jan. 15th, 2020, to BAGrant@bookarchitecture.com

Submission Criteria: 10 pages of writing (max 2,500 words) from a work-in-progress of any genre, along with a 1-page cover letter (max 400 words). This cover letter should answer the following three questions:

  1. Why will getting away from the unending stream of responsibilities (children, aging parents, day jobs, chores, etc.) help you push this project over the top… i.e, git-r-done? We want to know things like: How long have you been working on it? What number draft is this? How clearly can you see the finish line, etc.?
  2. What good is this project doing you? Who were you before this project started and who do you hope to be when it ends?
  3. What good is this project doing the world? Like, really. We’re interested.

Stipulations:

  • Grant money will not be delivered to recipients. Instead, travel expenses up to $2,500 will be paid directly by Book Architecture. Approved expenses include transportation, lodging, and meals. Requests for equipment upgrades will be considered as part of a getaway package. Wine-in-a-box you will have to get on your own.
  • Grantees will share a description of their travel/writing experience in a blog on the Book Architecture website.
  • Grantees will be required to sign a legal waiver stating that if anything happens to them while they are away it’s not our fault (duh).

Judging: Book Architecture has partnered with InkHouse to be the sole judges for this award. InkHouse is an integrated PR agency for innovative thinkers, creators and leaders who believe in the power of stories to effect positive change. We are satisfied with their judging criteria, and their decisions will be final. Book Architecture will be able to confirm that your submission was received and passed along…but that’s about it.

The Writer’s Dictionary

Writer [rahy-ter] noun:

Someone who writes.


Getting Published [get-ting pub-lished] verb (used with object):

The act of making a piece of writing public.

Getting published indicates that someone else is doing (some of) the public-making.

Self Publishing [self pub-lish-ing] verb:

The act of making a piece of writing public.

Undertaken for a host of reasons including financial, creative, and personal.


Good Writing [good ry-ting] adjective and noun:

They finished it.


Criticism [krit-e-sizem] noun:

They didn’t like it.


Getting Paid [get-ting payd] verb (used with object):

Deriving some benefit from your writing whether cash, barter, product placement.

Or beer.


Success [suhk-ses] noun:

Now, you didn’t think we were going to define success for you, did you?


Fans [fanz] noun:

They told you they liked it (see, good writing).


Haters [hay-terz] noun:

Think they could have done it better (see, criticism).


Sales [sayles] noun:

Determined by the following formula: Desire of the purchaser divided by the price of the product, multiplied by the product availability to the power of the author’s karma….

Okay, we don’t know what the formula for sales is.

But if you figure it out, let us know, who’s your buddy, huh?


Editor [ed-i-ter] noun:

Someone who has seen the next draft of your work, in their mind.


Proof Reader [proof-reed-er] noun:

Hopefully a discreet fellow. Someone who knows that we all make mistakes.


Memoir [mem-wahr] noun: What happened to you.

Novel [nov-uhl] noun: What happened to you on some level.

Poetry [poh-i-tree] noun: What happened to you with different punctuation.

Non-Fiction [non-fik-shuhn] noun: What happened to you and a bunch of other people.


Networking [net-wur-king] verb:

Always a good idea.


Belief in Oneself [bih-leef in wuhn-self] noun:

Also, always a good idea.

Especially when you are trying to figure out if

you belong among the things you love.

Which clearly you do.


Book Architecture:

A Method for organizing and revising a manuscript.

 

Why I Unsubscribed from your Newsletter

At the new year, I think we all enjoy a fresh slate, which sometimes means unsubscribing from a few of the newsletters, advertisements, and company news bundles we get all too often.

Hey, I’m okay if you unsubscribe from this newsletter if it will help you get your writing done, or if you’re not a writer and you receive this as a personal legacy, or if you’re sick of me and everything I represent. Go on; I won’t be offended.

Besides, the real problem with unsubscribing from newsletters is not initiating the action — it’s those circles they give you to fill in. What kind of milquetoast choices are these?

  • “No longer interested.”
  • “Did not sign up for this newsletter.”
  • Or worst of all, “Unspecified.”

We need some real options, like:

  • Our conversation at the cocktail party ended awkwardly.
  • Someone I know doesn’t like you.
  • I must have been drunk.
  • The way you automatically generated my name in the “To” field made me doubt the possibility of human connection in the digital age.
  • Your success vaguely threatens me.
  • This is my burner email.
  • You unsubscribed from my list, SOooo…

Seriously, though, we all need to preserve our minds, and I don’t begrudge anyone the right to filter what they take in.

Of course, I hope you stick around. But if you go, go in peace — and make 2017 the best year ever.